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Showing posts from December, 2009

Maintenance Management of your company's PLC (Programmable Logic Controller).

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What is a PLC? How many PLCs is your bottom line depending on? Do you have an up to date list of all PLC model types, part availability, program copies, and details for your company? Do you have at least one trained person per shift, to maintain and troubleshoot your plant PLCs? Does your maintenance personnel work with PLCs following written company or corporate policy, and procedures?
If you could not answer with confidence or you answered ‘No’ to any of the above questions, you need to read this article on maintenance management of PLCs. Why? Because the PLCs (Programmable Logic Controllers) are the brains of your operation. When the PLC is not functioning properly, lines shut down, plants shutdown, even city bridges and water stations could cease …

PLC Training / Tutorial for Allen-Bradley (Video 1 of 11)

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Image via WikipediaThese proven training techniques distinguish Ron Beaufort's Training from most other courses.
Find the rest of the series here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhLIOM...
Learn to be an effective troubleshooter, by teaching you to think the same way PLCs do.

These subjects are typically covered in the first few hours of the 40 hour long PLC Boot Camp course. The class room teaching is done with challenging hands-on exercises that ensure you retain what you learn.

These videos focus on the PLC-5, SLC-500, and Micrologix series. There are also PLC Boot Camp classes for the ControlLogix platform.

See this channel for the rest of this series:
http://www.youtube.com/RonBeaufort

Visit : http://www.ronbeaufort.com for more lessons online


ITS PLC Professional Edition

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Image by oomlout via FlickrITS PLC stands for Interactive Training System for PLC. It is a software designed for PLC training and education. With ITS PLC you get five real world based industrial systems so you can program your PLC and validate your control algorithm through a real-time interactive experience.

Website: http://www.realgames.pt





Made in Germany | Coal Mining Technology

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Image by Getty Images via DaylifeGermany's coal mining industry is all but finished as viable coal seams are worked out. Following an earthquake, mines in the Saarland will close in 2012 and mining in North Rhine-Westphalia's will end in 10 years at most.

But German mining equipment is still in demand; more than a hundred mostly medium-sized businesses have found customers in countries where mining is booming. One such company is Eickhoff, in Bochum, which produces milling and cutting equipment for coal mining. Now Eickhoff exports 95% of its mining equipment, mainly to China and Russia. Robert Donauer went to a mine in the Ruhr Valley and paid a visit to Eickhoff.



Made in Germany | Siemens - Hightech Trains for Russia

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Image via WikipediaRussian state railway company RZD is soon to receive the first of eight high-speed trains ordered from Siemens that will cut one hour off the trip from Moscow to St. Petersburg.

The deal that is worth over 600 million euros has involved various new challenges for the German electronics and engineering giant; the railway gauge in Russia is 33cm wider than in Germany, and the trains will also have to withstand harsh local weather conditions, with temperatures sometimes dropping to minus 50°C. Testing has so far been limited to simulations. But the first "Velaro RUS" train is now ready for shipment to Russia via the Baltic Sea. Our reporters Alexa Meyer and Alexandra von Nahmen are on board for its maiden voyage.




Made in Germany - High Speed Train

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Image via WikipediaBisnis baru, Kereta cepat buatan Jerman.

Deutsche Bahn's planned stock market flotation due to take place in late October was postponed because of the global financial crisis, but it has not been scrapped. News of lucrative executive payouts linked to the flotation have attracted considerable criticism. At the moment, DB managers are traveling the world on the hunt for investors and new business ventures.

Germany's rail company is aiming to expand internationally with the help of its subsidiary DB-International. It has a staff of 800 and is involved in big infrastructure projects: from the building of a rail line through Saudi Arabia to the training of high-speed-train drivers in Taiwan. Only Germany and France have drivers who are experienced enough to drive these trains. Now they're helping to train their Taiwanese counterparts. Michael Altenhenne has visited the Deutsche Bahn's subsidiary in Taiwan.